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PLAY - Times Square

Play and leisure present itself as a landscape of like minded free individuals part taking; free exception and a narrative of enjoyment. Environments shown in didactic ways create therapy pleasure, enjoyment and general well being within a society. Public Space that gets created with mass society becomes a space of sensory indulgence. Contemporary cities adopt street lighting, a sensory extravagant overload to create an environment of fantasy and imagination. Simulating and constructing a theme, a landscape of leisure activity giving the ability to explore opportunities that can be indulged upon, inverting that relationship into pleasure and leisure. 
An immersive environment, Time Square ranges of movies, studios, theatres which fragment reality. US media and entertainment dominate the public space. Its physical characteristics are commercially heightened by its entertaining appeal. The infrastructure and logistics consider that leisure time is a reward of working in order to enjoy.

http://newconstructionmanhattan.com/nyc-apartments-by-landmark/times-square

PLAY - Times Square Play and leisure present itself as a landscape of like minded free individuals part taking; free exception and a narrative of enjoyment. Environments shown in didactic ways create therapy pleasure, enjoyment and general well being within a society. Public Space that gets created with mass society becomes a space of sensory indulgence. Contemporary cities adopt street lighting, a sensory extravagant overload to create an environment of fantasy and imagination. Simulating and constructing a theme, a landscape of leisure activity giving the ability to explore opportunities that can be indulged upon, inverting that relationship into pleasure and leisure. An immersive environment, Time Square ranges of movies, studios, theatres which fragment reality. US media and entertainment dominate the public space. Its physical characteristics are commercially heightened by its entertaining appeal. The infrastructure and logistics consider that leisure time is a reward of working in order to enjoy. http://newconstructionmanhattan.com/nyc-apartments-by-landmark/times-square

LEISURE TIME Leisure time can be free from obligations, work and tasks, it can be used as an activity that people engage on in their own time and free from anything work orientated or life maintenance responsibilities. A participants perception of leisure time is dependable on how they engage upon it in their free time, what they determine their leisure time to consist of; perceiving freedom, and competence, intrinsic motivation and a positive effect on attitude are elements in which determines an experience of leisure time. Although the engaging of an activity can vary in reason whether its relaxation, competition or growth, it is not necessarily a definition as to how one should feel but an action that takes place during time away from work and perceived freedom. I have used the gym as an example of my leisure time as it is now an extremely multifunctional place; the uses have expanded to allow people to socialise, relax and use their time with the various facilities such as hairdressers and beauty salons, cafe, sunbeds, spas in addition to the stimulation of maintaing fitness and health through the gym itself. http://localdiaries.wordpress.com/ http://manicureandpedicure.org/tips-in-getting-spa-treatments-for-men-and-women

URBANISM. 4 The City is not a Tree

Christopher Alexander suggests that the functions within a city stems from the ideas of different patterns and systems; the main two ideas for the city is a tree like system or a semi-lattice. Alexander’s concept describes the modern city planning to be organised by the structure of a tree and consequently the city is not alive. We associate trees to be a significant representation of nature although their structure has no overlap; the function of the cities simply grow in one direction but cannot cross or meet, this allows no interaction or relationships to be explored. It seems the system of a tree may have been created unintentionally, allowing the cities to grow and attempt a structure of organisation however, cities which have a semi-lattice structure embrace the intense and active social environment and provides opportunities for functions and networks to cross paths. The semi-lattice design creates connections throughout the city and becomes more complex and layered; energy and dynamism are the most appealing elements of the city and are how they should naturally be, a semi lattice structure is what cities need to be successful.  

"There is abundant evidence to show that high buildings make people crazy.
High buildings have no genuine advantages, except in speculative gains for banks and land owners. They are not cheaper, they do not help create open space, they destroy the townscape, they destroy social life, they promote crime, they make life difficult for children, they are expensive to maintain, they wreck the open spaces near them, and they damage light and air and view. But quite apart from all this, which shows that they aren’t very sensible, empirical evidence shows that they can actually damage people’s minds and feelings.” -
Christopher Alexander, A Pattern Language

http://blog.hansdezwart.info/2010/06/15/christopher-alexanders-a-pattern-language/

http://www.rudi.net/pages/8755

http://www.rudi.net/node/20538

- (Accessed on 10/05/12)


 
thisbigcity:

urbanination:

Haas & Hahn’s repainting of Brazilian favelas. 

重新妝點巴西貧民窟。

thisbigcity:

urbanination:

Haas & Hahn’s repainting of Brazilian favelas. 

重新妝點巴西貧民窟。

(via thisbigcity)

INVISIBLE CITIES by ITALO CALVINO
As a reader we are to understand that the book ‘Invisible Cities’ holds a series of enchanting tales; cities in which character Marco Polo has visited, as told to Kublai Khan, the Chinese Emperor who does not speak in the same language and yet is fascinated by the travellers depiction of poetic imagery. Polo dreams of the various cities: thin cities, cities and desire, cities and the dead, cities and memory, continuous cites, cities and signs. These cities are represented as women’s names - Raissa, Irene, Phyllis, Chloe…the cities are personified and are referred to as distinctive characters, he develops an identity for individual spaces. It is eventually understood that the stories Pool describes are within the City of Venice. Spaces confided in the city are reflective upon people and its buildings as the way you see the city is through the use of water; the reflections you see and the play of light and shadow reflects on the characters he has used to identify these spaces and has created an imagination to explore the means and relationships of the city. Khan discovers that imagining Venice is imagining yourself.

The imaginative approach the book has towards the potential of cities has been used by architects and artists to envision the possibilities of how cities could be. It renders an alternative formation and function where imagination can no longer be limited but explored; a form of utopia in one’s world.

INVISIBLE CITIES by ITALO CALVINO As a reader we are to understand that the book ‘Invisible Cities’ holds a series of enchanting tales; cities in which character Marco Polo has visited, as told to Kublai Khan, the Chinese Emperor who does not speak in the same language and yet is fascinated by the travellers depiction of poetic imagery. Polo dreams of the various cities: thin cities, cities and desire, cities and the dead, cities and memory, continuous cites, cities and signs. These cities are represented as women’s names - Raissa, Irene, Phyllis, Chloe…the cities are personified and are referred to as distinctive characters, he develops an identity for individual spaces. It is eventually understood that the stories Pool describes are within the City of Venice. Spaces confided in the city are reflective upon people and its buildings as the way you see the city is through the use of water; the reflections you see and the play of light and shadow reflects on the characters he has used to identify these spaces and has created an imagination to explore the means and relationships of the city. Khan discovers that imagining Venice is imagining yourself. The imaginative approach the book has towards the potential of cities has been used by architects and artists to envision the possibilities of how cities could be. It renders an alternative formation and function where imagination can no longer be limited but explored; a form of utopia in one’s world.

modern-luxury:

La Maison Champs Elysées ~ http://bit.ly/poWtk5

modern-luxury:

La Maison Champs Elysées ~ http://bit.ly/poWtk5

(Source: cjwho)

CITIES. 1 Utopia - City as a Vector of the Imagination 

The word ‘Utopia’ was originally an Ancient Greek word ‘eu-topos' and is defined as an ideally perfect place, condition or state; in its social, political and moral aspects. An ideal society in which everyone is content and in their own state of bliss. However what does this mean for different people? It is surely a fantasy in each individuals mind and imagination; wherever it takes them. In 1516, Sir Thomas More coined the word 'Utopia' from the greek 'ou-topos’meaning ‘nowhere’ or ‘no place’. So the two terms almost define each other; Can a perfect world ever be realised? Can the world ever be free of conflict in reality or does utopia only exist in ones mind?

CITIES. 1 Utopia - City as a Vector of the Imagination 

The word ‘Utopia’ was originally an Ancient Greek word ‘eu-topos' and is defined as an ideally perfect place, condition or state; in its social, political and moral aspects. An ideal society in which everyone is content and in their own state of bliss. However what does this mean for different people? It is surely a fantasy in each individuals mind and imagination; wherever it takes them. In 1516, Sir Thomas More coined the word 'Utopia' from the greek 'ou-topos’meaning ‘nowhere’ or ‘no place’. So the two terms almost define each other; Can a perfect world ever be realised? Can the world ever be free of conflict in reality or does utopia only exist in ones mind?

CITIES. 7 The Town - Country Magnet

During the nineteenth century, Britain was transformed from a rural to urban society. Most citizens lived in towns or cities. The English garden city movement was founded by Sir Ebenezer Howard at the beginning of the twentieth century; an attempt at Utopia. This influenced urban planning throughout the world. Communities were designed viable to the economy, rather than housing development. The notion was to combine the two cultures of nature and city and create a balance of both lifestyles instead of residents having to choose either direction. However it is questionable that the integration of two contrasting environments could possibly mean a loss of their purpose, or perhaps identity? Are they considered to be separate for a reason or can it simply be the beauty of both worlds.     

"There are in reality not only, as is so constantly assumed, two alternatives - town life and country life - but a third alternative, in which all the advantages of the most energetic and active town life, with all the beauty and delight of the country, may be secured in perfect combination. Human society and the beauty of nature are meant to be enjoyed together.’" Ebenezer Howard, 1898

http://www.rickmansworthherts.freeserve.co.uk/howard1.htm (Accessed on: 25/04/2012)

(Source: visitingdc.com)

PLAY - Times Square

Play and leisure present itself as a landscape of like minded free individuals part taking; free exception and a narrative of enjoyment. Environments shown in didactic ways create therapy pleasure, enjoyment and general well being within a society. Public Space that gets created with mass society becomes a space of sensory indulgence. Contemporary cities adopt street lighting, a sensory extravagant overload to create an environment of fantasy and imagination. Simulating and constructing a theme, a landscape of leisure activity giving the ability to explore opportunities that can be indulged upon, inverting that relationship into pleasure and leisure. 
An immersive environment, Time Square ranges of movies, studios, theatres which fragment reality. US media and entertainment dominate the public space. Its physical characteristics are commercially heightened by its entertaining appeal. The infrastructure and logistics consider that leisure time is a reward of working in order to enjoy.

http://newconstructionmanhattan.com/nyc-apartments-by-landmark/times-square

PLAY - Times Square Play and leisure present itself as a landscape of like minded free individuals part taking; free exception and a narrative of enjoyment. Environments shown in didactic ways create therapy pleasure, enjoyment and general well being within a society. Public Space that gets created with mass society becomes a space of sensory indulgence. Contemporary cities adopt street lighting, a sensory extravagant overload to create an environment of fantasy and imagination. Simulating and constructing a theme, a landscape of leisure activity giving the ability to explore opportunities that can be indulged upon, inverting that relationship into pleasure and leisure. An immersive environment, Time Square ranges of movies, studios, theatres which fragment reality. US media and entertainment dominate the public space. Its physical characteristics are commercially heightened by its entertaining appeal. The infrastructure and logistics consider that leisure time is a reward of working in order to enjoy. http://newconstructionmanhattan.com/nyc-apartments-by-landmark/times-square

LEISURE TIME Leisure time can be free from obligations, work and tasks, it can be used as an activity that people engage on in their own time and free from anything work orientated or life maintenance responsibilities. A participants perception of leisure time is dependable on how they engage upon it in their free time, what they determine their leisure time to consist of; perceiving freedom, and competence, intrinsic motivation and a positive effect on attitude are elements in which determines an experience of leisure time. Although the engaging of an activity can vary in reason whether its relaxation, competition or growth, it is not necessarily a definition as to how one should feel but an action that takes place during time away from work and perceived freedom. I have used the gym as an example of my leisure time as it is now an extremely multifunctional place; the uses have expanded to allow people to socialise, relax and use their time with the various facilities such as hairdressers and beauty salons, cafe, sunbeds, spas in addition to the stimulation of maintaing fitness and health through the gym itself. http://localdiaries.wordpress.com/ http://manicureandpedicure.org/tips-in-getting-spa-treatments-for-men-and-women

URBANISM. 4 The City is not a Tree

Christopher Alexander suggests that the functions within a city stems from the ideas of different patterns and systems; the main two ideas for the city is a tree like system or a semi-lattice. Alexander’s concept describes the modern city planning to be organised by the structure of a tree and consequently the city is not alive. We associate trees to be a significant representation of nature although their structure has no overlap; the function of the cities simply grow in one direction but cannot cross or meet, this allows no interaction or relationships to be explored. It seems the system of a tree may have been created unintentionally, allowing the cities to grow and attempt a structure of organisation however, cities which have a semi-lattice structure embrace the intense and active social environment and provides opportunities for functions and networks to cross paths. The semi-lattice design creates connections throughout the city and becomes more complex and layered; energy and dynamism are the most appealing elements of the city and are how they should naturally be, a semi lattice structure is what cities need to be successful.  

"There is abundant evidence to show that high buildings make people crazy.
High buildings have no genuine advantages, except in speculative gains for banks and land owners. They are not cheaper, they do not help create open space, they destroy the townscape, they destroy social life, they promote crime, they make life difficult for children, they are expensive to maintain, they wreck the open spaces near them, and they damage light and air and view. But quite apart from all this, which shows that they aren’t very sensible, empirical evidence shows that they can actually damage people’s minds and feelings.” -
Christopher Alexander, A Pattern Language

http://blog.hansdezwart.info/2010/06/15/christopher-alexanders-a-pattern-language/

http://www.rudi.net/pages/8755

http://www.rudi.net/node/20538

- (Accessed on 10/05/12)


 
thisbigcity:

urbanination:

Haas & Hahn’s repainting of Brazilian favelas. 

重新妝點巴西貧民窟。

thisbigcity:

urbanination:

Haas & Hahn’s repainting of Brazilian favelas. 

重新妝點巴西貧民窟。

(via thisbigcity)

INVISIBLE CITIES by ITALO CALVINO
As a reader we are to understand that the book ‘Invisible Cities’ holds a series of enchanting tales; cities in which character Marco Polo has visited, as told to Kublai Khan, the Chinese Emperor who does not speak in the same language and yet is fascinated by the travellers depiction of poetic imagery. Polo dreams of the various cities: thin cities, cities and desire, cities and the dead, cities and memory, continuous cites, cities and signs. These cities are represented as women’s names - Raissa, Irene, Phyllis, Chloe…the cities are personified and are referred to as distinctive characters, he develops an identity for individual spaces. It is eventually understood that the stories Pool describes are within the City of Venice. Spaces confided in the city are reflective upon people and its buildings as the way you see the city is through the use of water; the reflections you see and the play of light and shadow reflects on the characters he has used to identify these spaces and has created an imagination to explore the means and relationships of the city. Khan discovers that imagining Venice is imagining yourself.

The imaginative approach the book has towards the potential of cities has been used by architects and artists to envision the possibilities of how cities could be. It renders an alternative formation and function where imagination can no longer be limited but explored; a form of utopia in one’s world.

INVISIBLE CITIES by ITALO CALVINO As a reader we are to understand that the book ‘Invisible Cities’ holds a series of enchanting tales; cities in which character Marco Polo has visited, as told to Kublai Khan, the Chinese Emperor who does not speak in the same language and yet is fascinated by the travellers depiction of poetic imagery. Polo dreams of the various cities: thin cities, cities and desire, cities and the dead, cities and memory, continuous cites, cities and signs. These cities are represented as women’s names - Raissa, Irene, Phyllis, Chloe…the cities are personified and are referred to as distinctive characters, he develops an identity for individual spaces. It is eventually understood that the stories Pool describes are within the City of Venice. Spaces confided in the city are reflective upon people and its buildings as the way you see the city is through the use of water; the reflections you see and the play of light and shadow reflects on the characters he has used to identify these spaces and has created an imagination to explore the means and relationships of the city. Khan discovers that imagining Venice is imagining yourself. The imaginative approach the book has towards the potential of cities has been used by architects and artists to envision the possibilities of how cities could be. It renders an alternative formation and function where imagination can no longer be limited but explored; a form of utopia in one’s world.

modern-luxury:

La Maison Champs Elysées ~ http://bit.ly/poWtk5

modern-luxury:

La Maison Champs Elysées ~ http://bit.ly/poWtk5

(Source: cjwho)

CITIES. 1 Utopia - City as a Vector of the Imagination 

The word ‘Utopia’ was originally an Ancient Greek word ‘eu-topos' and is defined as an ideally perfect place, condition or state; in its social, political and moral aspects. An ideal society in which everyone is content and in their own state of bliss. However what does this mean for different people? It is surely a fantasy in each individuals mind and imagination; wherever it takes them. In 1516, Sir Thomas More coined the word 'Utopia' from the greek 'ou-topos’meaning ‘nowhere’ or ‘no place’. So the two terms almost define each other; Can a perfect world ever be realised? Can the world ever be free of conflict in reality or does utopia only exist in ones mind?

CITIES. 1 Utopia - City as a Vector of the Imagination 

The word ‘Utopia’ was originally an Ancient Greek word ‘eu-topos' and is defined as an ideally perfect place, condition or state; in its social, political and moral aspects. An ideal society in which everyone is content and in their own state of bliss. However what does this mean for different people? It is surely a fantasy in each individuals mind and imagination; wherever it takes them. In 1516, Sir Thomas More coined the word 'Utopia' from the greek 'ou-topos’meaning ‘nowhere’ or ‘no place’. So the two terms almost define each other; Can a perfect world ever be realised? Can the world ever be free of conflict in reality or does utopia only exist in ones mind?

CITIES. 7 The Town - Country Magnet

During the nineteenth century, Britain was transformed from a rural to urban society. Most citizens lived in towns or cities. The English garden city movement was founded by Sir Ebenezer Howard at the beginning of the twentieth century; an attempt at Utopia. This influenced urban planning throughout the world. Communities were designed viable to the economy, rather than housing development. The notion was to combine the two cultures of nature and city and create a balance of both lifestyles instead of residents having to choose either direction. However it is questionable that the integration of two contrasting environments could possibly mean a loss of their purpose, or perhaps identity? Are they considered to be separate for a reason or can it simply be the beauty of both worlds.     

"There are in reality not only, as is so constantly assumed, two alternatives - town life and country life - but a third alternative, in which all the advantages of the most energetic and active town life, with all the beauty and delight of the country, may be secured in perfect combination. Human society and the beauty of nature are meant to be enjoyed together.’" Ebenezer Howard, 1898

http://www.rickmansworthherts.freeserve.co.uk/howard1.htm (Accessed on: 25/04/2012)

(Source: visitingdc.com)

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Faye Ryan Interior Architecture and Design UCA

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